Configuration Management: Projects, programs and portfolios

The need for formal configuration management based on a simple version of control depends on the scale and complexity of the objectives. This also depends on the level of specification change that is followed. In projects that have contracts based on firm price payment methods, no changes are followed. In changing the agility project, this is an inseparable part of the method. Both the need for context on different versions of the path to a product in development and the need to support product verification of specifications, the configuration management tool must be adjusted in very different situations.

In scope management, the definition of work produces a product that consists of the structure and detailed description of each product. This is a configuration as well as a baseline. This depends on formal change control and configuration management.

Some projects are more complex because they are very critical in terms of safety, security, or related environment. In larger projects, many people may be involved in product development, testing and integration. Configuration management has the role of ensuring that there are no gaps in the quality control chain, testing and records maintained for all products.

The program management team needs to ensure that all outputs are appropriate and their functions are also in the context of the blueprint. Every project and field of activity change in the program must use a consistent approach to managing configuration. This facilitates the assessment of whether product changes from one project have an impact on other project products, or on the program’s final benefits.

Portfolios may not produce other configuration items in key management documents but if different projects and programs are submitted together to achieve strategic objectives, the portfolio management team must adjust to the configuration to ensure final integration achieves results on demand.