A Simple Plan For Investigating Homes

Primary Purpose of a Mold Inspection

The air quality inside a residential or commercial building may be greatly affected when there is a detected mold environment growing inside, especially when the molds are of the airborne species, as they are a common source of allergen and can be the primary cause of health problems for the building residents, such as sneezing, runny nose, cough, eye irritation, upper respiratory irritation, and, in serious condition, asthma attack. Water leaking constantly in a building and has not been given immediate remedial action for a long period of time may result into dampness in the indoor environment and the existence of mold growth. Molds exist to contribute to the natural habitat of decomposing dead matters, that is why they can pose a serious adverse effect inside a building environment, when they are found existing, as they are likely to decompose any wood, porous materials in the building, including drywalls and carpets.

The purposes of conducting a mold inspection are the following: testing for the presence of molds inside an establishment; when there is a positive presence, identifying the mold species; locating where the molds are growing inside the establishment; and, when remedial action has been done to remove the molds, a post-inspection is performed to assess if the molds have been completely eliminated.

Conducting a mold inspection follows these 5 important procedures: interviewing of building owner or caretaker; conducting an ocular inspection; taking samples; having the samples analysed; and reporting.

Most of the relevant questions asked by a mold inspector during an interview with the building owner or caretaker are on the following: humidity problems inside the building, mold odor, presence of rook leaks or plumbing leaks, or any visible mold found inside.

When the inspector receives a positive reporting from the owner or caretaker of mold presence, he performs a visual inspection into the spot areas where there is likely water penetration or evidence of a mold habitat existing, using tools like moisture meters for detecting moisture, hydrometers for measuring the humidity, borescopes for viewing sections of walls, or laser thermometers for checking on the surface temperatures, as well as digital photographs, if the mold presence is detected.

The third important task of the mold inspector is to take air samples, outside and inside the building, by using a special sample instrument that can collect mold spores and provide counting results of spores collected, thereby giving a good analysis if the air quality inside the building has deteriorated.

Once air samples have been collected they are then taken to a professional analyst for determination and analysis for the number of mold spores per cubic meter of air, as well as finding out the specific type of mold found.

The final step is the written report of the inspector presenting photos of the mold growth, spore level and type and his conclusions and recommendations for the removal of the molds.

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